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All Australian households set to receive a new garbage bin to help sort waste

Households across Australia are set to receive another garbage bin in a bid to further separate different forms of waste. 

Known as FOGO (Food Organics Garden Organics), the green bin may be strictly reserved for garden organics, or also allow food organics which are then composted, depending on which part of the country you live.

The new bin comes in addition to the red and yellow bins commonplace across Australia – which are for household waste and and glass bottles respectively.  

According to news.com.au, the federal government has committed to providing all households with a FOGO bin by 2023 – but the rollout so far has been slow, with the responsibility left in the hands of local councils. 

Randwick City Council in Sydney’s east, set the tone after introducing the FOGO bins in March this year. Residents went on to successfully divert 1,400 tonnes of food and organic waste from going to landfill. 

Some residents in Victoria have four bins for their waste, with the newest addition the purple top (right) for food and garden organics

Some residents in Victoria have four bins for their waste, with the newest addition the purple top (right) for food and garden organics

In South Australia, residents have three bins - the red top is for waste, the yellow for recycling and green for organics (pictured)

In South Australia, residents have three bins – the red top is for waste, the yellow for recycling and green for organics (pictured)

NSW typically separates its rubbish into compost (left), recycling and landfill (right)

NSW typically separates its rubbish into compost (left), recycling and landfill (right)

Below is a breakdown of how garbage bins are currently allotted to each state and territory across Australia.

NSW

Most households are given a general waste bin (red lid), recycling bin (yellow lid) and garden vegetation bin (green lid). 

Some households may also have a maroon-lidded bin for food scraps, for residents in the Inner West and City of Sydney council areas.

Victoria

As well as general waste, recycling and FOGO bins, many Victorian households also have a fourth, purple glass-only bin. The first Australian state to do so, the new bins have been rolled out into 13 local councils, and will be expanded to include all Victorian households by 2030. 

Queensland

Residents are given the opportunity to divide their bins into general waste, recycling and garden waste.

Currently the Sunshine State is conducting a 12 month trial of the FOGO bins in  three councils – Townsville City Council, Rockhampton Regional Council and Lockyer Valley Regional Council. 

South Australia

South Australia operates under a three-bin system, with a red bin for general waste, yellow bin for recyclables and a green FOGO bin for items such as food scraps, paper towels, tissues and garden scraps. 

Tasmania

Have successfully implemented the FOGO bins along with the standard household rubbish bin which has either a red, dark green or black lid, and a classic yellow-lid bin for recyclables.

ACT

Most homes in the nation’s capital feature a standard 140 litre red-lid garbage bin and a 240 litre yellow-lid recycling bin. Households can also apply for another 240L green bin for garden organics for a one-off registration fee of $50. These bins are used to dispose of plant materials like weeds, flowers, small branches, leaves and twigs.

Households in the suburbs of Belconnen, Bruce, Cook and Macquarie will also receive FOGO bins from this week onwards.

Western Australian residents have three bin systems they can choose from, with many opting for red (waste), yellow (recyclables) and green (plant materials) - a fourth bin is pending for many purely for organic waste

Western Australian residents have three bin systems they can choose from, with many opting for red (waste), yellow (recyclables) and green (plant materials) – a fourth bin is pending for many purely for organic waste

Tasmanian locals also use three bins to separate their rubbish - and have embraced the FOGO bins recently

Tasmanian locals also use three bins to separate their rubbish – and have embraced the FOGO bins recently

Western Australia

Typically, WA households have three bin systems to choose from.

The two-bin system sees residents allocated one yellow bin for recyclables and one red bin for general waste.

Alternatively, the three-bin garden organics (GO) system, sees residents given an additional green-lidded bin for plant materials, plus the standard red and yellow bins.

Locals in the West can also choose a three-bin food organics, garden organics (FOGO) system. The main difference is the green bin can also process food scraps and paper products. 

Northern Territory

The Top End operate using the two-bin model. Residents can divide their waste between two bins – a red-lidded bin for general waste and a yellow-lid bin for recycling.

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